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Spring 2022 Course

Spring 2022 Course

New Online Spring Course

New Online Spring Course

"Tolle lege..." next meeting Oct. 29

"Tolle lege..." next meeting Oct. 29

Consisting of George Mason faculty and students from various disciplines and fields of study, this Center for Humanities Research reading group focuses on recent but also classic works on the critical study of religion. Every semester it will read and discuss a particular book. For fall 2021 this group will be meeting via Zoom every-other Friday (beginning Sept. 17) at 11am to discuss Dangerous Religious Ideas by Rabbi Rachel Mikva. Prof. Mikva is currently scheduled to come to campus on November 10 to discuss her book both in a public lecture and privately with the Religious Studies Reading Group. For more information about the group, including being added to its listserv, please contact either Maria Dakake (mdakakem@gmu.edu) or Garry Sparks (gsparks@gmu.edu).

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Maria Dakake awarded Templeton Grant

Maria Dakake awarded Templeton Grant

Maria Dakake, associate professor in religious studies, and co-investigator Martin Nguyen of Fairfield University, in partnership with Mason's Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, have been awarded a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation for their project, “Islamic Moral Theology in Conversation with the Future” (IMTF).

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Socratic Society

Socratic Society

If someone is liberal and tolerant, does that mean that person should tolerate everything, or is a line drawn at some point? Those are the kinds of questions George Mason University’s Socratic Society, under the direction of Dr. Charles “Chuck” Garrettson (term assistant professor in Religious Studies) has been tackling for the past two years. The Socratic Method, named for the Greek philosopher Socrates, involves an instructor structuring a dialogue with students through a series of probing questions. And the Socratic Society is a way for students with diverse beliefs and backgrounds to connect on a deeper level through informative and often lengthy discussions outside of class. This fall semester the Socratic Society will be meeting in-person every Friday at 5pm in the Johnson Center. For more information, please contact the student coordinators: Meg Merillat and Ben White or Prof. Chuck Garrettson (cgarre@gmu.edu).

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Feature Fall Course

Feature Fall Course

Each section of RELI 235 is unique. Students read different kinds of literature and about different religions depending on each section of this course. This fall semester 235-007 in particular will focus on the unique ancient creation and hero myths of Native Americans, specifically the ancient Maya. They built pyramids. They invented the zero and the rubber ball. They created an elaborate writing system long before the arrival of European missionaries. And when Christian missionaries did eventually arrive in the 1500s the Maya secretly wrote down their religious stories. Rediscovered centuries later, these Native American legends and the way they were told influenced contemporary literature around the world, namely magical realism. Believe it or not, this course will examine all of this during the fall in RELI 235-007, M/W 10:30am-11:45am.

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New Fall Course!

New Fall Course!

3,000 years of beautiful tradition, from Moses to Sandy Koufax. No understanding of the history of the West but especially of the contemporary Middle East, but also of American humor from stand-up comedy to TV and film, or even other Abrahamic religions like Christianity and Islam is complete without at least a solid introductory knowledge of Judaism. RELI 370 is that introductory course as well as the core course for a minor in Judaic Studies. Be there or be two corners shy of a six-pointed star. T/Th noon-1:15pm.

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New This Fall: Paul and His Letters (RELI 335)

New This Fall: Paul and His Letters (RELI 335)

The letters of the Apostle Paul are the earliest texts in the New Testament and provide important information about the earliest communities of Jesus-followers. This class interrogates the social and historical contexts of these letters while also exploring their rich and dynamic interpretive histories, paying close attention to the ways that they have been used (and misused) in ethical debates and calls for political action since the earliest days of the Jesus Movement. Sound cool? Join us in RELI 335, Fall 2021, T/Th 4:30-5:45.

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